Why Royal Canin Maine Coon adult cat food may help your cat's health

Royal Canin Maine Coon adult cat food has been formulated to deal with the known inherited health problems of Maine Coons namely a predisposition towards HCM (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) and a predisposition towards joint disease namely hip dysplasia and patellar luxation. 


This cat food ostensibly contains ingredients to encourage a strong heart function. These ingredients are taurine, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). It seems that these ingredients which are types of omega-3 fats encourage a healthy heart and good blood circulation. 

They are found mainly in fish and fish oil. But please see a veterinarian about this. Apparently a study found that EPA is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular events. That applies to people but the same will apply to cats including Maine Coon cats but this is the field of qualified veterinarians.

This food also contains glucosamine and chondroitin sulphate, two ingredients which support strong bones and joints. That is a direct reference to the two joint diseases referred to above which are common in Maine Coon cats.

Patellar luxation is a condition in which the kneecap rides outside the feral groove when the knee is flexed. I have some articles about the prevalence of hip dysplasia in Maine Coon cats which you might like to read. You can click on this link if you wish.

This is a large pellet-sized dry cat food. They say it's tailor-made for a big domestic cat. However, I personally wouldn't endorse a diet that is exclusively on dry cat food. I'm not qualified to advise on that so please see a veterinarian but I think you will find that most veterinarians will recommend a diet primarily made of wet cat food with some dry food for grazing.

P.S. This is not a promotion by me. I am just discussing this cat food in case a Maine Coon owner is unaware of this product.

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