Do Maine Coons get along with other Maine Coons?

Well, the question is like asking if two unrelated moggies will get along or if two unrelated adult cats from two different cat breeds will get along. Once they are adult it depends on their character and whether they have been socialised to each other. If two Maine Coons are raised together, they will hopefully get along when adult. You can't rely on the fact that two siblings will get on once they become adults. And that applies to Maine Coons or any other cat breed or non-purebred cat.

Sweet looking young Maine Coon
Image: MikeB. This is a photo-edited image

It just depends, is the answer. But if they are siblings, and young Maine Coons they will get on and play together. Or if they are very young Maine Coons and unrelated there will get along probably. It is just when they become adults that they become independent-minded. They are ready to create their own home range and settle down in their own territory. This is a wild cat trait and the Maine Coon like all domestic cats is ultimately a domesticated North African wildcat. And wildcats are solitary creatures. That's the underlying character.

With that mentality they will see other adult Maine Coons as an invader to their territory. So, for example, if you adopt an adult Maine Coon and the cat settles down in your home for a few years and then you think that you would like to adopt another adult Maine Coon cat, there may be difficulty because the resident cat may object to an incoming cat sharing their home range with them.

The same argument, as mentioned, applies whether we are referring to Maine Coons or other cat breeds or non-purebred cats. It's about being adult and the mindset that goes with being an adult domestic cat.

It does seem that some cats are more territorial than others and this goes across the breeds and all non-purebred cats. Males tend to be more concerned about protecting their territory compared to females. And male cats want a larger home range than female cats.

Of course, the domestic cat is adaptable and that is why in multi-cat homes domestic cats often get along even though they are full-time indoor cats with their home ranges compressed into a very small area and which are all shared. It's about adaptability and the adaptability is encouraged by the fact that there is a food source for all the cats in a multi-cat home. This tends to make them more accepting of their circumstances.

There's been lots spoken on the Internet about how to introduce a new cat to a resident cat. I won't go over those points as it will be very boring. But I believe that if the resident cat does not like a newcomer, then the best you can expect is an acceptance by the resident cat, but I don't think you can expect with much confidence that the cats will get along really well as great friends in the future. And sometimes there is a continual friction no matter what you do. This will be down to the individual cats' character.

The bottom line really is whether they are raised together and if two unrelated Maine Coon kittens are raised together and socialised to each other they should or might grow up to be adults who are friendly with each other for life. Once again there is barrier of the solitary wild cat mentality inside the domestic cat, and it takes effect instinctively.

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